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White-headed duck project approved

01-Feb-2002

The project aims to establish a sound information base and identified network for effective conservation actions for the Central Asian Population of the White-headed Duck. The project will review th...
The project aims to establish a sound information base and identified network for effective conservation actions for the Central Asian Population of the White-headed Duck. The project will review the status of the Central Asian population, and to identify the key Range States of the species, and current conservation activities and provide recommendations for the species conservation. A field survey will be conducted in Pakistan in February 2002, and this will provide the information for the current status of the population in the main wintering area in South Asia. This initiative will also assist in the development and implementation of the Central Asian – Indian Flyway Action Plan that is currently being developed by the Wetlands International- Russia Programme. The White-headed Duck is a globally threatened species (IUCN 1996). The Convention of Migratory Species includes it in Appendix I and considers it a species for "Concerted Action". Four populations of the species are recognised. The West Mediterranean population is increasing (now over 1,000 individuals), a small Algeria/Tunisia, an East Mediterranean population in a steep decline (a few 1000 individuals) and a Central Asian wintering population of 300 individuals. Heredia et al. (1996) have prepared an action plan for threatened species of Europe including Oxyura leucocephala and it is being implemented. While there is very little information available on the Central Asian wintering population of Oxyura leucocephala, it is potentially an isolated population undergoing a rapid decline. The Central Asian population occurs in southern Russia, Kazakstan, western Mongolia, western China, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Pakistan (and rarely in India). Pakistan is undertaking conservation efforts at the important wintering sites, however the population has declined in the last few years and the causes are unknown. Conservation measures being implemented in other countries are also unknown. Wetlands International, through its office in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, is responsible for the management and implementation of this project. The project will conclude in December 2002.

Press contact

Press can contact:

Ms. Ytha Kempkes
Communications and Advocacy Manager
Tel. +31 (0)318 660933
Email: ytha.kempkes@wetlands.org

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