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Entries for December 2011

04-Feb-2016, views: 481

Bregje van Wesenbeeck, Deltares, reporting from Demak, Indonesia

“She must be really good at writing” the villagers are whispering behind my back. I am sitting on a small bamboo platform, used for fishing, with my notebook on my lap to write down the sedimentation rates behind our permeable dams. The four guys of the team are wrestling through the mud and shout the values to me: “5 centimetres of sedimentation behind our dam”, “45 centimetres here”, “erosion in the control plot”. 

03-Feb-2016, views: 207

Wetlands International is happy to announce that Applications are now open for the 'Second training course on mangrove ecosystems of the Western Indian Ocean region'. The 10-day training is held at the Centre of Marine Sciences, Moana, University of Nairobi Diani, Kenya, from 17 – 28th  May 2016. Deadline for applications: 6 March 2016.
 

02-Feb-2016, views: 561

The precipitous loss of wetlands and freshwater biodiversity over the last decades has been widely reported – and alongside this, many organisations, including Wetlands International, point to the urgent need to give greater emphasis to protecting and better managing wetlands and especially freshwater ecosystems. What will it take to turn the trends for wetlands around?

29-Jan-2016, views: 378

By Ward Hagemeijer

24 January 2016, Barr al Hikman - This day’s #IWC50 count of Barr al Hikman in Oman covers the land north of the Shannah harbour. The result was good and interesting sightings were made including a Barbary Falcon Falco pelegrinoides hunting for waterbirds. However, the highlight of today was a finding on the mudflats adjacent to our campsite, at low tide. Leon found a nice group of Great Knots Calidris tenuirostris and amongst them a bird with colour rings on its leg, probably marked by researchers all the way from Sakhalin in Eastern Russia! This very exciting record reinforces the global importance of Barr al Hikman, including it being a home to the Great Knot, a species with populations under threat. 

28-Jan-2016, views: 267

How to stay posted about the emerging trends for ecosystems and biological diversity that are currently on the margins of mainstream discussion? 

26-Jan-2016, views: 458

By Ward Hagemeijer

Barr Al Hikman, 26 January 2016 – This past Saturday we counted 70,000 roosting birds along the shoreline of Bar Al Hikman, and another 120,000 on the sebkha (the Arabic word for salt plains), and the mangroves nearby. 

23-Jan-2016, views: 441

By Ward Hagemeijer

Barr al Hikman, 21 January 2016 - After weeks of preparation and anticipation, the big day arrived: the 2016 counts in Oman!

14-Jan-2016, views: 389

A group of local and international NGOs have send a letter to the pulp-for-paper giant APRIL regarding the management of its concessions on tropical peatlands in the Kampar Peninsula. APRIL recently announced a peatland restoration project. However, at the same time, the company is continuing to drain peatlands in the same region, for pulp plantations which jeopardizes the peatland conservation and restoration ambitions.

 

08-Jan-2016, views: 1226

January 2016. To mark the 50th count of the International Waterbird Census (IWC), Wetlands International has launched a year-long campaign “Let’s make it count” in partnership with its national and international IWC partners, volunteers and governments. With this campaign Wetlands International wants to raise the bar and increase the number of important wetland sites covered by the annual count, and ensure the latest and most up-to-date information about waterbirds is available to support conservation action worldwide. The IWC was launched 50 years ago and has become one of the most valuable biodiversity monitoring programmes in the world. This programme  supports conservation and management of wetlands and waterbirds in all the world’s flyways. We need your help to make this special year count for waterbirds and their conservation! 

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14-Dec-2015, views: 963

By Femke Tonneijck, Wetlands International and Eelco Leemans, Clean Shipping Coalition

One of the greatest challenges in coastal engineering is reducing the carbon footprint, according to Sander Dekker and Hedwig Thorborg – who are working with the two largest dredging companies globally (Van Oord and Boskalis respectively). Generally, emission reductions in the dredging sector are achieved by employing more energy efficient vessels, using cleaner fuel and minimising transport distance during construction, which may enable a CO2 reduction of around 10-20  per cent. But recent exploratory research by Deltares and RoyalhaskoningDHV shows that the carbon footprint of coastal infrastructure projects may be more significant and complex than previously thought.

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