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Entries for September 2008

01-Oct-2015, views: 268

Tackling the biggest coastal resilience challenge in West Africa

The Senegal River is the second largest river in West Africa and forms the natural border between Senegal and Mauritania for much of its course as it flows west towards the Atlantic Ocean. At the coastal delta it flows past the low river banks of the city of Saint-Louis. From there it turns south, running alongside a thin strip of sand dunes separating it from the ocean for the last 30 km until it reaches the river mouth. 

01-Oct-2015, views: 92

A new article in Science Direct discussing the short term and long term solutions to counter large-scale erosion and subsidence of tropical muddy coastlines.

01-Oct-2015, views: 410

Wetlands International welcomes the decision of Royal Dutch Shell to stop Arctic oil and gas exploration in the Chukchi Sea off the coast of Alaska. The position of Wetlands International is that the risks of exploration and production of oil and gas in the Arctic region, especially offshore, are too high for nature, people and the climate and that these risks cannot be managed down towards levels that are acceptable to society.

29-Sep-2015, views: 251

Over 100 civil society organizations from Argentina, led by the Argentina office of Wetlands International, addressed the Parliament last week to get the full approval of the Minimum Standards Law for Wetlands Conservation. The call comes after the latest flooding incidence in the Buenos Aires province, which caused five deaths and affected 30,000 people of which 6,000 were forced to leave their homes. 

28-Sep-2015, views: 355

From Saturday 26 till Tuesday 29 September the 2015 Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) Annual Meeting is taking place in New York. On Monday, September 28 Jane Madgwick, CEO of Wetlands International, a CGI member, spoke about one of the central themes ‘Water Scarcity’. With 20 percent of the world’s GDP and 36 percent of the global population located in severely water stressed areas, the growing demand and competition for freshwater will be one of the biggest global challenges we face. She emphasized that wetland ecosystems are essential for storing and regulating water and the continuing loss and degradation of wetlands is a strong driver of increasing water risks. 

28-Sep-2015, views: 318

On Friday 25 September the UN member states formally adopted the new development goals, which will set the world’s development agenda for the next 15 years. The 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aim to tackle poverty, climate change and inequality around the world. We believe that wetlands will make a valuable contribution to these goals and are an indispensable link between the SDGs.

24-Sep-2015, views: 315

Wetlands International will be speaking about this issue at the upcoming Clinton Global Initiative Annual Meeting. The Clinton Global Initiative was established in 2005 by President Bill Clinton to convene global leaders to create and implement solutions to the world's most pressing challenges. This year’s Annual Meeting will take place on 26-29 September in New York.

23-Sep-2015, views: 172

From The Wadden Sea is proving to be a weak link in the East Atlantic Flyway, a migratory bird route from the Arctic region down the coasts of Europe and Africa to South Africa. Bird counts have revealed that the more dependent a migratory bird population is on the Wadden Sea, the less successful conservation of the species tends to be. Migratory birds breeding in the Wadden Sea are particularly vulnerable, although some fish-eating species are actually faring better in recent years.

21-Sep-2015, views: 238

On November 11, 2015 Ecoshape is organizing the conference 'Building the Future'. Wetlands International is co-organising workshop 2 on mangrove restoration. Be inspired by the latest developments on  Building with Nature and register now!


20-Aug-2015, views: 702

Wageningen and Bogor. A new report commissioned by Wetlands International for the first time quantified the provision of mangrove ecosystem services according to different management regimes. The study concludes that ecosystem service provision depends strongly on the type of management and that mangrove-rich management regimes generally outscore aquaculture regimes. Decision-makers can make management choices depending on the desired outcome in terms of ecosystem services.

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