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Entries for 'alizia.kamani'

27-Jul-2015, views: 327

Wetlands International expresses its extreme concern today over the continued and increasing exploration for and production of oil and gas in the Arctic.  Activities like these could jeopardise Arctic marine and coastal wetlands, which are critical for nature and people as well as the global climate.

29-Jun-2015, views: 422

Wetlands International takes the 17th spot on the International Centre for Climate Governance top 100 list for climate think tanks in 2014. Read more here. 

01-Jun-2015, views: 960

1 June 2015 - Wetlands International advocates a focus on a key role for wetlands in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), and for strengthening resolutions on peatlands and on disaster risk reduction; and an increased budget at the 12th global wetland conference (Ramsar COP12) in Punta del Este, Uruguay (1-9 June 2015). 

06-Feb-2015, views: 991

Asia Pulp and Paper (APP), the biggest pulp and paper company in Indonesia, celebrates its 2-year anniversary of its Forest Conservation Plan today. APP has eliminated the use of natural forest fiber in its entire supply chain and halted new activities on peatlands. However, analysis shows that the company struggles with its commitment to adopt Best Management Practices in its existing plantations and in peat swamp forests to avoid GHG emissions.

05-Feb-2015, views: 987

The Hague, 4 February 2015 – The WASH IT! alliance was delighted to learn that it was selected as one of 25 strategic partners of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs for 2016-2020.

02-Feb-2015, views: 3026

By Kate Pearson and Alizia Kamani

Throughout history wetlands have been integral to human survival and development. How? Simple: Wetlands[i] are life – food, water, fibre. We depend on them – people, business and nature. Yet they are highly threatened. Globally the world has lost more than 54%[ii] of its wetlands and this loss has accelerated by four times in the last 70 years[iii]. People and businesses impact wetlands, creating problems of water scarcity, excessive floods and pollution. So what does this mean for our future?
 

20-Dec-2014, views: 867

Mumtadar called from the pond where he was setting nets.  Life was good since they planted the mangroves along the dyke, he said.  He caught more fish in his pond, and they grew bigger and quicker.
by Fred Pearce

19-Dec-2014, views: 1354

“The wave was higher than the trees.  The sea came right over the village.  Every building was destroyed, including all 300 houses.   About 180 people were killed, more than half the population.  The only people who survived were those who ran for the hills.”  That’s how they tell it in the cafe at the entrance to Keude Unga on Aceh’s west coast, which took the full brunt of the tsunami.
by Fred Pearce

18-Dec-2014, views: 1250

Layeun is famous among the tsunami villages of Aceh.  Bill Clinton came here earlier this year and brought the media.  He called for new help to rebuild the lives of the fishing community whose homes disappeared beneath the waves during the tsunami.

By Fred Pearce

17-Dec-2014, views: 1222

Precisely 256 people were living in Gampong Baro on the day the tsunami hit.  Just under half of them died.  Just 24 bodies were found, while 97 are registered forever “missing”.  Their names and ages are all listed on a stone memorial in the heart of the village.

by Fred Pearce

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