News

Current Articles | Search | Syndication
Add to iGoogle or Google Reader

Entries for 'alizia.kamani'

17-Dec-2013

By Bas Tinhout

In the tropics, peat swamp forests are often logged and converted to oil palm and pulp wood plantations. This results in adverse effects on the natural resource base of local communities and impacts the biodiversity, water regulation and carbon storage functions of peatlands. As an alternative, paludiculture is a sustainable form of agriculture which enables the productive use of rewetted peatlands. It will prevent the oxidation of the peat carbon, thus preventing the massive natural organic carbon store from turning into the greenhouse gas CO2.

18-Nov-2013

Author: Yus Rusila Noor, Wetlands International, Indonesia

Often conservation work starts with individual initiatives. The stories of Haji Madsahi and Babah Akong emphasize the value of local knowledge and initiative for the restoration of coastal ecosystems. They have both received awards for their work and Wetlands International now works with them, so that their efforts can be further scaled up. 

14-Nov-2013

A controversial report from a technical committee of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is under-estimating the amount of greenhouse gas emitted by palm oil grown on tropical peatlands by nearly 50%, according to NGOs.

 

13-Nov-2013

Authors: Femke Tonneijck, Wetlands International; Bregje van Wesenbeeck, Deltares; and Mark Spalding, The Nature Conservancy

Inhabitants of low lying delta areas are particularly exposed to flooding and erosion caused by storms and hurricanes. These pressures increase with climate change and sea level rise. Coastal wetlands, such as mangroves, can play a key role in damage mitigation during disasters, as well as in stabilising coastlines. They also contribute to aquaculture and fisheries. Integration of ecosystem-based coastal protection in climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction policies and resulting measures to conserve these landscapes are essential if mangroves are to keep protecting us. Full article featured in Outreach Magazine.

12-Nov-2013

Author: Marcel Silvius

Oil palm cultivation on peatlands is seen as an attractive option for many plantation developers in Southeast Asia. Not only is the land extensively available, the soils – despite the poor soil fertility – are somehow “working” for oil palm cultivation. Peatlands can therefore be perceived as lucrative and attractive for expansion of oil palm plantations.

So why then is oil palm on peat a path to disaster? We highlight two major impacts in this article. Firstly, peatland drainage for oil palm results in substantial carbon emissions. Secondly it results in flooding and land loss as a result of soil subsidence. We also offer some solutions.

Full article featured in sustainable Palm Oil: Conversation and Debate
 

Pages: 2 of 5

News from our offices

Press contact

Press can contact:

Ms. Ytha Kempkes
Communications and Advocacy Manager
Tel. +31 (0)318 660933
Email: ytha.kempkes@wetlands.org

Press kit

Latest Tweets

TweetId: 514365956156846081 Wetlands Int. WetlandsInt WetlandsInt "Slappe pap verandert in stevige kust" van René Didde #VK over ons werk in Indonesië #buildingwithnature @deltares http://t.co/hgASp1Uhml 23-09-14 10:49
TweetId: 514350754187210752 Wetlands Int. WetlandsInt WetlandsInt Staff Medal of Excellence awarded to Daniel Blanco & Ritesh Kumar. Congratulations to both! http://t.co/zXADrowfYz 23-09-14 09:49
TweetId: 514123305667018752 Wetlands Int. WetlandsInt WetlandsInt Luc Hoffmann medal awarded to W.J. Wolff of the Netherlands & Ikal Angelei of Kenya. Congratulations! http://t.co/tjLVpqQW85 22-09-14 18:45