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04-Feb-2016, views: 703

Bregje van Wesenbeeck, Deltares, reporting from Demak, Indonesia

“She must be really good at writing” the villagers are whispering behind my back. I am sitting on a small bamboo platform, used for fishing, with my notebook on my lap to write down the sedimentation rates behind our permeable dams. The four guys of the team are wrestling through the mud and shout the values to me: “5 centimetres of sedimentation behind our dam”, “45 centimetres here”, “erosion in the control plot”. 

29-Jan-2016, views: 406

By Ward Hagemeijer

24 January 2016, Barr al Hikman - This day’s #IWC50 count of Barr al Hikman in Oman covers the land north of the Shannah harbour. The result was good and interesting sightings were made including a Barbary Falcon Falco pelegrinoides hunting for waterbirds. However, the highlight of today was a finding on the mudflats adjacent to our campsite, at low tide. Leon found a nice group of Great Knots Calidris tenuirostris and amongst them a bird with colour rings on its leg, probably marked by researchers all the way from Sakhalin in Eastern Russia! This very exciting record reinforces the global importance of Barr al Hikman, including it being a home to the Great Knot, a species with populations under threat. 

26-Jan-2016, views: 486

By Ward Hagemeijer

Barr Al Hikman, 26 January 2016 – This past Saturday we counted 70,000 roosting birds along the shoreline of Bar Al Hikman, and another 120,000 on the sebkha (the Arabic word for salt plains), and the mangroves nearby. 

25-Nov-2015, views: 965

What do you do when mangroves fail to naturally recolonise abandoned rice fields in one of the most precious mangrove deltas of the world? Pieter van Eijk reports on a recent mission to Western Africa that paves the way for large-scale mangrove recovery through a so-called ‘ecological restoration’ approach.

16-Jul-2015, views: 1277

Wetlands International is very saddened to learn of the passing of Jean-Paul Taris who was a legendary wetland champion. Our thoughts are especially with his wife Christine, their two boys and of course with Dr Luc Hoffmann, his great friend. 

10-Jun-2015, views: 1703

By Jane Madgwick, CEO Wetlands International

As I leave behind the vast and wild beauty of Uruguay’s coasts, I have some mixed feelings about the progress made at the 12th Ramsar Convention on Wetlands Conference of Parties (COP), held in Punta del Este. “What was it for?”, the uninitiated may ask. Actually I’m asking myself the same question, even though I have 25 years of experience engaging with this Convention and the COPs. 

26-Mar-2015, views: 2222

By Marie-Jose Vervest - What is the best approach to restore and protect a coastline that was hit by a Tsunami? Driven by my own involvement in mangrove restoration after the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami and ‘Building with Nature’ approaches with Wetlands International, I attended the event ‘Global approaches to coastal resilience’ organized by READY Asia-Pacific  at the WCDRR in Sendai. In this session coastal protection measures after the March 11th 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan were discussed. 

14-Mar-2015, views: 2037

By Fred Pearce - In October 2013, one of the fiercest cyclones to hit the Bay of Bengal for many years made landfall on the low-lying delta coast of the Indian state of Odisha. With winds battering the coastline at more than 200 kilometres per hour, the structural damage from cyclone Phailin was intense. Thousands of straw, timber and bamboo homes were destroyed across the delta of the River Mahanadi, one of India’s largest deltas. Trees were uprooted, cars upturned and power lines broken across the delta as high winds were accompanied by a three-metre storm surge.

14-Mar-2015, views: 2136

By Fred Pearce - The Inner Niger Delta in central Mali is a giant green oasis on the edge of the Sahara desert. It is one of the country’s most productive areas, but also among its poorest. At the height of the wet season, when the River Niger is swollen by heavy rainfall in Guinea, an area the size of Belgium, from Mopti to Tombouctou, turns into a landscape of lakes. 

12-Mar-2015, views: 1305

By Fred Pearce - As demand for water grows in river basins, downstream users often suffer. This is especially true when those users depend on rivers and natural wetlands, which many still regard as “wasted” water. That is the case on the river Ewaso Ngiro in Kenya, which drains from the glaciers of Mount Kenya through the heavily populated agricultural region of Laikipia in central Kenya, to the Lorian Swamp in the arid northeast. 

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