Mangrove restoration

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Mangrove restoration

13-Mar-2015, views: 470

Sendai, Japan - De aanpak van rampen zoals overstromingen en droogtes moet zich veel meer richten op het duurzamer gebruik en herstel van ecosystemen zoals wetlands. Dit stelt Stichting Wetlands International in de aanloop van de VN wereldtop voor rampenbestrijding waar overheden van 14-18 maart een nieuw verdrag zullen sluiten voor de komende 20 tot 30 jaar in Sendai, Japan. 

13-Mar-2015, views: 592

Sendai, Japan - Tackling disasters such as floods and droughts should focus much more on the sustainable use and restoration of ecosystems such as wetlands, states NGO Wetlands International in the run-up to the UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction where governments will conclude a new treaty for the next 20 to 30 years from 14-18 March in Sendai, Japan.

09-Mar-2015, views: 741

Environmental degradation in coastal, river basin and mountain areas increases the risk of disaster. Wetlands International will be represented at the Third UN World Conference on Reducing Disaster Risk (WCDRR) in Sendai and will keep you posted through a series of posts on developments in Sendai and on the urgent need to safeguard and restore wetland ecosystems as a key strategy to address water security challenges. 

03-Mar-2015, views: 2201

3 March, Jakarta - The Indonesian and Dutch government today launch a comprehensive five-year multi million public-private partnership initiative for enhancing coastal safety at the North Coast of Java. It aims to build stable coastlines with reduced erosion risk through a unique integration of mangrove restoration, small scale hard-engineering and sustainable land use. 

 

02-Feb-2015, views: 2618

By Kate Pearson and Alizia Kamani

Throughout history wetlands have been integral to human survival and development. How? Simple: Wetlands[i] are life – food, water, fibre. We depend on them – people, business and nature. Yet they are highly threatened. Globally the world has lost more than 54%[ii] of its wetlands and this loss has accelerated by four times in the last 70 years[iii]. People and businesses impact wetlands, creating problems of water scarcity, excessive floods and pollution. So what does this mean for our future?
 

23-Dec-2014, views: 973

Coastal belts of mangroves contribute to security by reducing the impacts of severe storms and cyclones, provide food and building materials, and are essential habitats for a large number of animal species, in particular several commercially important fish species. Listen to a radio interview with Wetlands International in French on mangroves, fisheries, coastal defence and aquaculture on La Voix de l'Amérique

23-Dec-2014, views: 792

By Fred Pearce. Timing is everything. And Michael Hobbes, an old aid hand and human rights consultant, got the timing spot on with his recent blog at The New Republic on how “big ideas are destroying international development”.

19-Dec-2014, views: 1060

“The wave was higher than the trees.  The sea came right over the village.  Every building was destroyed, including all 300 houses.   About 180 people were killed, more than half the population.  The only people who survived were those who ran for the hills.”  That’s how they tell it in the cafe at the entrance to Keude Unga on Aceh’s west coast, which took the full brunt of the tsunami.
by Fred Pearce

18-Dec-2014, views: 940

Layeun is famous among the tsunami villages of Aceh.  Bill Clinton came here earlier this year and brought the media.  He called for new help to rebuild the lives of the fishing community whose homes disappeared beneath the waves during the tsunami.

By Fred Pearce

17-Dec-2014, views: 940

Precisely 256 people were living in Gampong Baro on the day the tsunami hit.  Just under half of them died.  Just 24 bodies were found, while 97 are registered forever “missing”.  Their names and ages are all listed on a stone memorial in the heart of the village.

by Fred Pearce

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