Disaster risk reduction / climate change adaptation

Current Articles | Search | Syndication


Disaster risk reduction / climate change adaptation

02-Feb-2015, views: 2006

By Kate Pearson and Alizia Kamani

Throughout history wetlands have been integral to human survival and development. How? Simple: Wetlands[i] are life – food, water, fibre. We depend on them – people, business and nature. Yet they are highly threatened. Globally the world has lost more than 54%[ii] of its wetlands and this loss has accelerated by four times in the last 70 years[iii]. People and businesses impact wetlands, creating problems of water scarcity, excessive floods and pollution. So what does this mean for our future?
 

21-Jan-2015, views: 492

The free Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Disasters and Ecosystems: Resilience in a Changing Climate went live on 12 January. More than 7,500 people have enrolled from 183 countries to learn more about this hot topic in disaster resilience! Wetlands International will be Expert of the Week between 9 and 11 February, sharing our expertise on putting ecosystem based disaster risk reduction into practice. People can still enroll at no costs. 

 

23-Dec-2014, views: 730

Coastal belts of mangroves contribute to security by reducing the impacts of severe storms and cyclones, provide food and building materials, and are essential habitats for a large number of animal species, in particular several commercially important fish species. Listen to a radio interview with Wetlands International in French on mangroves, fisheries, coastal defence and aquaculture on La Voix de l'Amérique

23-Dec-2014, views: 544

By Fred Pearce. Timing is everything. And Michael Hobbes, an old aid hand and human rights consultant, got the timing spot on with his recent blog at The New Republic on how “big ideas are destroying international development”.

19-Dec-2014, views: 729

“The wave was higher than the trees.  The sea came right over the village.  Every building was destroyed, including all 300 houses.   About 180 people were killed, more than half the population.  The only people who survived were those who ran for the hills.”  That’s how they tell it in the cafe at the entrance to Keude Unga on Aceh’s west coast, which took the full brunt of the tsunami.
by Fred Pearce

18-Dec-2014, views: 618

Layeun is famous among the tsunami villages of Aceh.  Bill Clinton came here earlier this year and brought the media.  He called for new help to rebuild the lives of the fishing community whose homes disappeared beneath the waves during the tsunami.

By Fred Pearce

17-Dec-2014, views: 621

Precisely 256 people were living in Gampong Baro on the day the tsunami hit.  Just under half of them died.  Just 24 bodies were found, while 97 are registered forever “missing”.  Their names and ages are all listed on a stone memorial in the heart of the village.

by Fred Pearce

16-Dec-2014, views: 704

by Fred Pearce

Azhar, leader of Lham Ujong, is a proud man.  Proud of the pictures in his album of him shaking hands with dignitaries bringing aid money to the village.  Proud of his Olympic torch, which he helped take round Jakarta in the run-up to the Beijing Olympics of 2008 – a privilege he was nominated for by Wetlands International.  And proud especially of the trees planted in huge numbers round his village in the aftermath of the tsunami.

15-Dec-2014, views: 998


[This article originally appeared at Yale Environment 360, a publication of the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.]

The tsunami that struck Indonesia in 2004 obliterated vast areas of Aceh province. But villagers there are using an innovative microcredit scheme to restore mangrove forests and other coastal ecosystems that will serve as a natural barrier against future killer waves and storms.
By Fred Pearce

11-Dec-2014, views: 685

11 December 2014, Manila - Only one year after the deadly Typhoon Haiyan, which left behind over 6,000 casualties, Typhoon Hagupit has taken at least 20 lives before being downgraded to a tropical depression.

Pages: 1 of 8

Press contact

Communications and Advocacy Department
Tel. +31 (0)318 660933
Email: communications@wetlands.org